Tag Archives: kerala tourism

Simple, but delicious food

How to cook a perfectly delicious meal on a houseboat

As we cruised the waters of the Vembanad lake, I went to investigate my most favourite place. The kitchen.

That’s where all the action is, after all.

Joji, one of the 3 staff members on the boat, was busy frying something that looked fishy. And he confirmed my suspicions by identifying it as seer (or king) fish. The rest of our lunch was already done.

Seer fish being fried by our chef

Seer fish being fried by our chef

Luckily, I took to Kerala cuisine, like a duck takes to water. On an earlier trip to Kerala (details shall be withheld to protect offending party!) we were so busy eating all kinds of delicacies, that we didn’t make it in time for our flight out (also the first time in my flying history, I’ve missed one!).

Fried seer fish for our lunch on the houseboat

Fried seer fish for our lunch on the houseboat

On another trip with my sister and mom we had some really delicious fare, especially on our houseboat ride. Even my very hard-to-please mother was satisfied enough to give the chef some brownie points.
An array of delicious fare including fish fry, dal, tomato/onion relish and karela fry

An array of delicious fare including chicken fry, dal, tomato/onion relish and karela fry (bitter gourd)

I also realised that I am quite easy to please since since I’m very fond of coconut. Lately, the sister (also a former chef) has been extolling the virtues of coconut oil. And telling the whole family to adapt to it. Considering ours is an Assamese family, and we are addicted to our mustard oil, you can imagine that convincing my mother hasn’t an easy task.

Needless to say, she hasn’t succeeded on that front, but I’m already swayed by the goodness of this pure oil. I haven’t really done much research on it myself (sis has done enough for the whole family), but some factors indicate that it’s better than refined oil and also good for health. And that people in countries populated by coconut trees and who consume copious amounts of coconut oil are healthier. Interesting that though I don’t have statistics.

Delicious coconut chutney. It's hard to avoid coconut in  your cuisine when in Kerala

Delicious chutney with pineapple and lots of garnish

You see, in God’s own country, you can’t really go more than a few meters without encountering a coconut in one form or another. It’s in your food, your oil, your soap, and of course, in every frame. Imagine what your friends would say if you went back from Kerala without those sinful banana chips fried in coconut oil.
A variety of different chutneys including a beetroot pachadi

A variety of different chutneys including a beetroot pachadi (extreme left)

There must be more coconut trees in Kerala than in the rest of the world combined. Though I was told that there are absolutely no coconut related deaths in Kerala – a local told me this confidently. And yes, I have my doubts about this one.

Coming back to our houseboat, we’re on a cruise – possibly the most relaxing time we’ve had in Kerala so far. The Kerala Blog Express team has been split up into several groups. I am with two lovely women – Roxanne (aka The Tiny Taster from Mumbai) and Stefania (Dutch, but now residing in Malaga, Spain), who writes about life from an expat’s perspective. Roxanne loves food as her blog name suggests and takes pictures of everything before we partake of the delicacies. We’re all happy to finally get an opportunity to let our hair down and just relax – this time was much needed since we’ve been on the move since we arrived in Trivandrum.

We are travelling in style. This is our dining area on the houseboat.

We are travelling in style. This is our dining area on the houseboat.

We sit on the deck of our boat enjoyed the cool air as we made our way through the waters. Watching life pass in slow motion in front of us. Someone is making their way across to the other side in a smaller row boat. Another one is loaded with a cycle. A lady whipping her clothes on the lake shore and finishing her daily dose of laundry. A little kid bathing happily in the waters beside her home. It’s like watching a different kind of TV – daily life TV maybe.

The houseboat lunch has to be the most delicious so far in this trip. It could also be because it’s the closest to home cooked food, which I usually prefer when I travel. Most of my sojourns include homestays (something I’ve missed on this trip) because that’s where I get to taste the best local food.

A simple but yummy cabbage fry with onions, mustard seeds and coconut (but, of course!)

A simple but yummy cabbage fry with onions, mustard seeds and coconut (but, of course!)

This is what we got on our plate for lunch:
– A long beans sabji (vegetable fry)
– A cabbage fry (with my favourite ingredient, coconut)
– Sambar
– Seer fish fry
– Red rice
Lunch is served!

So much food. So little time.

The stir fries are simple, and usually cut into small bits. Like the cabbage. And garnished with black mustard seeds and coconut. This style of preparation is called a “thoran“.

And since this post is about cooking up a delicious meal, here’s the recipe a cabbage thoran you can try at home. It seems really simple!

Before this particular culinary treat, we were actually treated to our first traditional meal on another houseboat cruise, organised by Hotel Raviz, Kollam. They had put out an elaborate meal as we cruised the backwaters and and these were some of the delicacies I remember:
– Fried prawn (really succulent and the best I’ve had so far on the trip)
– Thalassery mutton biryani
– Roast chicken (not sure which style, but was quite good)
Meen moilee (coconut preparation – loved it!)
– Loads of pickles/raitas and sides like beetroot pachadi, crisp fried bitter gourd, pineapple raita and other chutneys that I didn’t take note of
– Appams with vegetable stew
There were also a few traditional vegetarian dishes, which I didn’t pay much attention to since there was prawn and fish :-)

Eating our way through Kerala - it's a tough job, you know!

Eating our way through Kerala – it’s a tough job, you know!

I think I must have been a Keralite in my last birth since I can’t seem to get enough of coconuts. Curries, chutneys, water, drinks – bring it on! Except in my hair. I realised after two days of trying to wash it out after a rather relaxing Ayurvedic massage at the Kumarakom Lake Resort.

Anyway, I must admit that I haven’t gone as far as my sister though. She even cooks her pasta in coconut oil. And claims it’s really delicious. That’s not something I’m not ready to try yet.

END NOTE:
This is part of a 15 day trip across Kerala with 25 other bloggers, travellers, writers and photographers and a promotion by Kerala Tourism. Follow the gang via the hashtag #keralablogexpress on Twitter/Instagram/Facebook. You can also follow us through the website, Kerala Blog Express.

The houseboats were provided by: Lakeslagoons.com. Clean, well appointed and attentive staff in case you’re looking for a company to rent houseboats while in Kerala.

Follow me on Twitter: @anitabora; Facebook: Anita Recommends and Instagram: anitabora

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And here’s presenting the world richest temple!

Well, we’re told the jury is yet to come in on that one. But what we’re sure is that it’s a really, really, really rich temple.

So in case you thought you were visiting a poor nation, steeped in poverty, with lots of homeless people (possibly also true); the other side of the story is that we also possess not one, but two of the richest temples in the world.

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Between, the Sri Padmanabhaswamy temple and the Tirupati temple, we could potentially have enough to feed the entire nation for a few years.

The temple is located in Thiruvananthapuram, and it shot into fame when in 2010, the news broke about all the wealth it was holding, deep within it’s vaults. An NDTV 2011 report says: “Last July, the world’s attention turned to the temple when the committee unearthed what one of its members said was gold, diamonds and precious antiques worth up to $40 billion.”

A kid running excitedly towards the temple.

A kid running excitedly towards the temple.

40 billion dollars! Now that is no small sum. And a little ironical coming to think of it. At least, if God does actually exist, he’s having a big laugh about all the wealth he’s collected over centuries. And it’s not like he hasn’t got enough already.

Anyway, if you (like me) were sleeping (or distracted by other things) while this news broke, in 2010, it was ordered that the contents of the vaults of the Padmanbhaswamy temple be made public. And that’s when all the jewels, gold and silver came (literally) tumbling out.

According to another NDTV report: “The four vaults already opened in recent days at the temple in Thiruvananthapuram, the capital of the southern state of Kerala, held a vast bounty that unofficial estimates peg at Rs. 90,000 crore. Other treasures unearthed so far include statues of gods and goddesses made of solid gold and studded with diamonds, rubies, emeralds and other precious stones, crowns and necklaces, all given as gifts to the temple over the centuries.’

A couple getting ready to enter the temple premises

A couple getting ready to enter the temple premises

They’re now in lengthy discussions (where I would love to be a fly in the wall!) about what to do with all the wealth and going by our record for debates, this one is going to be a very long one.

The wealth they’ve unearthed is apparently enough (of course, after many months of assessment) to wipe off India’s debt. But of course, they’re not going to do that. Someone suggested a closely guarded museum. That makes so much more sense right? Get people to admire all these riches from a distance. Hmm… Some have suggested the treasures being sold and the money being used for development of Kerala.

Coming back to these riches, the $40 billion dollars is only an estimation. I am rather curious to know what’s going to happen with all the riches. I know I’m not getting a cent, though some spare change would always help.

Security was ramped up when the news about the treasures was revealed. There are hidden cameras and black cat commandos all around. Apparently, some of the bare torso-exhibiting priests might also be security staff. Not surprisingly. You wouldn’t want someone to break in and suddenly run away with a lot of India’s (or God’s as the case might be) wealth.

Men need to be dressed in a mundu and women in a saree to enter the temple. It is also only accessible to Hindus.

Men need to be dressed in a mundu and women in a saree to enter the temple. It is also only accessible to Hindus.

Outside the temple, there are vendors who do brisk business renting sarees (for women) and wrap-around (mundus) for men. Garbed in this gear, and of course sporting your Hindu identity you are allowed to enter. We admire it from the distance, and there’s a road around it which you are allowed to walk through. But no photographs are allowed. I spot a shop there where two men are carving intricate wood sculptures of different gods. He starts to show me a few of them, but I have to tell him that I’m not really out to buy anything.

What I came away with is of course the million (or billion) dollar question: what will happen to all this wealth? But I doubt I’ll get an answer. Probably, not in this lifetime.

More news about Padmanabhaswamy temple
Official site

(Note: This trip is part of the 15 day Kerala Blog Express organised by Kerala Tourism with 25 other travellers, which started in Thiruvanthanpuram and makes it way around to Kollam, Kumarakom, Alleppey, Thekkady, Munnar, Wayanad, Calicut and then Cochin.)

Follow the trip on:
Facebook/Twitter/Instagram: #keralablogexpress

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