Tag Archives: Travel

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Wanderings in Bhuj: a photo journey

Like any other small but burgeoning town in this country, Bhuj exhibits all the usual signs. Development on one side – good wide main roads, vehicles, ATMs, and everyone flashing smart phones. But on the other hand, the litter and garbage everywhere is an indication that no lessons in waste management have been implemented. Sadly, it’s just everywhere, including the water body in the middle of the city – the Hamirsar lake.

Steeped in history, and scarred by a devastating earthquake in 2001, some parts of the old fort are still standing and visible as you move through the town. There are monuments that are crumbling, derelict, which give you a glimpse of those glory years. The small gallis through the town hold a quaint charm, albeit a little diminished by large amounts of garbage lying everywhere.

Wanderings in Bhuj
Like any small but growing town, Bhuj has fallen prey to all the usual problems

Wanderings in Bhuj
The narrow lanes are abuzz with activity

As I touched down in the small Bhuj airport and made my way down the main road, I am excited about my first trip to Gujarat. I decided to bypass Ahmedabad and Baroda, the larger towns, and head straight to Bhuj. My primary reason being that my hosts, Katie and Jehan Bhujwala have graciously offered to put me up at their ancestral home in the town and also help me out with my itinerary.

Wanderings in Bhuj
Situated in the camp area, the view from the home of my hosts Katie and Jehan

Wanderings in Bhuj
The house is lovely and is currently being renovated. It will soon be possible to stay there as Katie and Jehan will open it out as a home stay, hopefully from January 2015 onwards

The house is in the camp area and is constructed in the old style, with tall ceilings, filled with charming antique furniture around a large centre courtyard. The old world ambience still lingers on when you enter.

Once I’ve gotten my bearings, along with my hosts, I set off on a small “discover Bhuj” tour. The town still has the remnants of the old fort, and in places it’s quite intact. We pass by a beautiful gate with some detailed carvings.

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Parts of the old fort, still stand tall

The narrow gallis take us to an old building from the British Raj – an orange coloured structure that was the district collector’s office. In the afternoon sun, it reflects the light and still looks regal and stands out amidst the new concrete structures. Today, it faces a grim fate though. Like many of our beautiful old buildings; it will likely be ruined totally or razed to the ground.

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A building that is now abandoned; testament to the glory days of the past

A short ride away, is the Prag Mahal palace. The old jharokhas and balconies are still intricate and stand out on the palace wall. To the opposite side, is the new version of the palace. The earthquake of 2001 affected quite a lot of the palace walls and structure.

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The old palace walls, though affected by the earthquake still sport intricately carved jharokhas

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The new Prag Mahal palace, opposite the older one

The new building has an imposing clock tower and with its red brick walls, it projects a feeling of warmth in the fading light.
We wander over to the Bhuj market. Like any Indian bazaar, it’s busy, crowded and filled with people, cows and assorted creatures. Two wheelers and rickshaws honk, trying to assert their right of way. Mostly to be ignored. The honking gets more insistent. Women are about doing their clothes shopping, buying vegetables, silver jewellery, “farsan” – you name it, and it’s available in the market. Including music systems in case you’re missing one at home.

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For any kind of shopping, head to the Bhuj market

We wander around the streets for a while peeking into the different shops. A farsan shop walla generously allows us to taste a bit of his freshly fried goodies.

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Women flocking in front of an obviously popular shop
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A shopkeeper gets creative with his doors!
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Beautiful antique silver jewellery for sale
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No trip to Kutch without stocking up on their intricate embroidery work

A great place for juice is Bhudia’s which is another ride away from the market in an area near the Hamisar lake. The juice is fresh and we choose a delicious mix – guava and pomegranate – much recommended. They also have an organic farm a little outside of Bhuj where you can get a taste of the local thali, if you want to make the journey.

I’m happy with my first taste and sights of Gujarat. I even have fish fry for dinner, (after a visit to the local fish market) which I was a bit surprised about. I had planned to go vegetarian for this trip!

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The local fish market in Bhuj is an assault on the senses. But we did get some fresh fish

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A fish monger at work

I settle into my large room, adjoining a busy road listening to the hustle and bustle of traffic. My initiation into Gujarat has been hectic, noisy, smelly and colourful. But then I wouldn’t have it any other way!

Also check out the Bhuj Diaries album on Flickr

Desi Traveler Prasad

Fitness on the road: A few strategies that might work

So here’s the problem.

I like good food. And when I’m travelling, food obviously becomes even more of an issue. Let me explain why. I can’t really control what I’m eating. I like trying out local delicacies so I rarely say no. And if my host is cooking something, I would eat even if I’m not hungry (rarely does that happen though). I usually am.

So the big problem is that it doesn’t do any good to my waistline (I can’t actually find it these days). After every holiday, the scales tip a bit more. At this rate, I have to get new scales.

Bringing me to the main topic of this post. With all this gluttony, one has to figure out creative ways to keep fit. I’d love to hear how you do it, but here are some tips from my side. And why “might” work, you might ask? Because as you’ll probably realise, you have to put these to practice for results. So personally, I have tried to make a few of these work. At least I make an effort. At most times!

Devise a yoga routine

I tried this – putting together a series of exercises to keep me occupied for around 45 minutes. The problem is that I rarely actually do it. I also have a very low motivation level when I need to do things on my own. So it makes it all the more harder. I love yoga and have dabbled in all kinds. But asking me to do it on my own is like dragging a horse to water… You get my point.

A 45 minutes yoga session will make you feel refreshed and ready to take on anything!

A 45 minutes yoga session will make you feel refreshed and ready to take on anything

Go out for a jog

Usually, when I arrive at a place, to get a lay of the land, I go out for a jog. It’s a nice way to get familiar with the new roads and also discover the place. I did this during my Europe trip. I particularly remember the picturesque village of Le Vaud in Switzerland, where I was lucky enough to stay for a week. I venture out nearly every day and discover new roads and routes. It’s a lovely quiet village, with enough hills to keep the calf muscles burning. I ran a lot. Around the village. To the next town. I was even tempted to run down to the town at the bottom of the hill, but I realised it would be difficult to get a lift to come back up again.

Where there are footpaths and running trails, make use of them!

Where there are footpaths and running trails, make use of them

In Den Haag, Netherlands, when staying with friends, I was impressed by the city’s efficient network of roads and pathways for cyclists and pedestrians. It was walking and running paradise. After being shoved off the road, being second (no, actually third) class citizens on Bangalore’s road when you’re walking or cycling, this was truly paradise. A part of me didn’t want to come back. Ever. While I was there, I made sure I went out nearly everyday. Found some excellent routes, tree-lined avenues that went on forever. I loved it. And I’m not even a runner. I can just imagine how pleasurable it will be for a real runner.

In Spain, with Stefania, training for her next long run, I had a nice time jogging on Malaga’s very scenic beach, very close to her home. With a location like that, I would run everyday. Yes, I’d probably train for a marathon. But then, I don’t.

Borrow/rent (don’t steal) a cycle

Pedalling is a great way to get some exercise and see a city (a bit faster than walking). Most European cities have great infrastructure for cycling. Every city I visited – Den Haag, Amsterdam, Brussels, Antwerp, Malaga – has cycling lanes and also has places to rent cycles. In Amsterdam I did a cycling tour, enjoying the cycling lanes and getting a view of what the lucky citizens of the city get to experience everyday. In Den Haag, I borrowed a bike and went out exploring the city.

While in Den Haag, I made use of the extensive cycle pathways

While in Den Haag, I made use of the extensive cycle pathways


Rent or borrow a cycle - there's no better way to see a city and get some exercise

Rent or borrow a cycle – there’s no better way to see a city and get some exercise

My best biking experience was in Malaga when I decided to do my own little cycle tour, visiting an automobile museum, a park, a artsy neighbourhood, ending with a climb up (locked the cycle at the bottom of the hill) to watch a most brilliant sunset from a viewpoint called the “Castle of Gibralfaro”.

Enrol for walking tours

I love them! I also found a company called SANDEMANs New Europe which offers free walking tours in nearly all major European cities. And I did 3 of them – in Amsterdam, Brussels and Madrid. It’s a great way to glimpse local culture, food, environment and get interesting nuggets of information that you possibly wouldn’t be able to figure out on your own. Besides the hosts are usually really interesting characters who will keep you more than engaged. So we had Scott in Amsterdam, Berber in Brussels and Michael in Madrid who had their own unique styles and kept us amused and on our toes. The walks are around 3 hours and so you’ll be glad to sink in a chair and order that wine or beer once it’s over.

Walking tours are a great way to explore the city

Walking tours are a great way to explore the city

Hit the hotel gym

Most of them will have some kind of a health club. During our Kerala Blog Express trip, I still remember a particular hotel where we went through a set of darkly lit rooms to discover one treadmill in a corner. So, you never know. If you seek, you might find. I’m not a fan of gyms; give me the outdoors any day. But if there’s absolutely no other option, then it’s a good idea.

Use that pool

Shimmering blue waters beckon. And you look at it. Take photos. Dip your toes in. Contemplate.

Two pools to choose from at the beautiful Crowne Plaza, Kochi

Two pools to choose from at the beautiful Crowne Plaza, Kochi

Well, don’t. Just jump in. There’s nothing like a few laps of a pool to make you emerge refreshed and feeling good. And besides, swimming also burns calories I’ve heard. I love the water. If I had a pool, I’d probably be inside half of the day. So it’s a good thing I don’t. But most hotels come equipped with pools, so it’s a good thing to get in a swim first thing in the morning or towards the end of the day. Avoid those crowds of aunties though who step in wearing everything, including their family heirlooms and jewellery.

Use common objects

Okay, I haven’t actually tried it personally, but a friend vouches for it. You can use chairs, beds, sofas, tables and other such furniture lying around your room (and if you’re staying with friends hopefully they have enough furniture). Or even kitchen objects like water bottles, kettles. Using them as props, you can then do some simple exercises – you need to get creative. Look them up online and list around 10-12 of them in a notebook and do whichever ones are most convenient.

If all else fails, do 100 surya namaskars. Okay, maybe 20. You are on holiday after all.

So what is the routine that works for you?

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Savouring the world, one dish a time!

My first taste of Portuguese food was in Goa. The owners of the now restored 213 year old mansion Palácio do Deão, built by a Portuguese nobleman, had opened their doors to visitors for a taste of the traditional cuisine. I don’t remember the names of the dishes now but our hosts Rubem and Celia Vasco da Gama had gone to great lengths to lay out a memorable spread. I do remember the fish cooked to perfection. And the calamari flavored to bring any foodie to raptures.

Dining area
This old but restored Portuguese mansion made the ideal setting for a traditional meal

A taste of Portugal Main course

I’m glad I captured some of these culinary delights on camera so when I sit back and think of the delicious food, I can supplement my memories with photographs. Of course, the images don’t do justice to the actual taste of the mouth-watering delicacies served, but they only increased my curiosity about the cuisine and food of Portugal.

Goa was a Portuguese colony till as late as 1954 and the influences on the food and culture are indelible.

The Portuguese are said to have brought in potatoes, tomatoes, guavas and even cashews from Brazil to Goa and many of these ingredients today, find their way into Goan dishes, especially the Christian fare.

In my mind, there is no better way to explore a place than through it’s food and cuisine. And as cliched as it might sounds, I do actually live to eat so it seems but a natural way for me to explore a new place. I look forward to my next meal with anticipation, especially when I am travelling. I usually go armed with a list of recommended dishes and make sure I try at least a few of them.

Noodles
When in South East Asia, it’s difficult to resist a meal without noodles

Not only is exploring local cuisine interesting, but eating as the locals do adds to the whole experience.

I was recently in Vietnam, when I got to sample some really scrumptious local fare. From the traditional pho, to fresh and fried spring rolls, to the gorgeous (and tummy filling) pancakes filled with shrimp and rice, it was definitely a trip to remember for me. I even have memories of what I ate and at which particular place. The little non-assuming roadside eatery in Saigon where we sampled fresh spring rolls for the first time.

Making of the spring roll
A lady cooking fresh spring rolls; this has been her livelihood her whole life is what we’re told

The fish at a homestay in Mekong Delta, served like I’ve never fried seen before. The spring rolls we first learnt to make on a cruise ship and then relished. And the list goes on…

Pho in Vietnam
You can’t leave Vietnam without tasting the pho

Lots of seafood!
Streets are lined with sellers who pile up their stock and wait for buyers

Ingredients for the spring roll
The fresh spring roll is both delicious and healthy

I’ll have what he’s having!”

In March of this year, during a trip to Kerala I met with food and travel blogger, photographer Nelson Carvalheiro (and belatedly also found out how famous he really is!). Nelson in fact, through his amazing food pictures and experiences has the ability to bring about the above reaction from any onlooker.

Yoga poses with Nelson
Nelson indulging in a spot of yoga to get rid of all those calories piled up during our Kerala trip

During the trip, our meals were memorable, not only because of the varied spread but because of the fact that it would bring us together to discuss more about our cuisine and influences. We enjoyed authentic Kerala cuisine, the rice delicacies, the avial and stew, the fish cooked in different styles and best of all, the famous Kerala sadya (a multi-spread vegetarian meal) served during festivals but where everyone got a lesson on how to eat with their hands. It was an experience like no other. I was so taken in by the meal served on the houseboat while cruising the backwaters (probably our best!) that I even wrote about the experience.

Traditional fare from Kerala - appam with egg stew
Yummy egg stew served with fluffy appams in Kerala, India

Putta and kadlakai curry
Another delicacy called putta, with coconut and rice, along with kadla curry

As I head to Europe next in August visiting friends from various regions for the next couple of months, I am definitely looking forward to the more attractive aspect – sampling local fare. From the seafood paella and sangria of Spain to the variety of cheese in France, to the famed seafood and other delicacies of Portugal (if I am given a chance!), I’m surely looking forward to this trip already.

I definitely wouldn’t mind a “foodgasm”. I can’t think of a better way to experience Portugal!

(NOTE: This is an entry for the 16 day food tour of Portugal being conducted by APTECE. More details are here on Nelson’s blog. The last day is July 31.)

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Vietnam: A few first impressions

This was a different kind of trip. I didn’t do much research since my fellow traveller and photographer Hema took control of everything including the planning and organising (which I usually enjoy doing for my trips). For a change, I took a backseat as I was already busy planning an all girl’s trip to Wayanad. So I didn’t really have any notions/impressions except a guide book that I’d borrowed from a friend.

The guidebook indicated there were a few scams in some parts of Vietnam. But we didn’t come across any such unpleasant experiences. However, another group we met did tell us that cab drivers purposely take long routes even if the places are close by, just to make an extra buck. But after dealing with auto drivers in Bangalore, I think one is armed to take on a few greedy errant taxi drivers.

At no point during our trip did we actually feel threatened or unsafe in Vietnam. (In fact, I have at time felt more unsafe in some parts of India). The people are quite stoic but once you converse with them (or try as their English is very limited), they are quite friendly. Except for one very surly cab driver (he was definitely unhappy with his life) people were generally quite nice. English is not their strong point, but with a lot of effort (and gestures) usually we got our message across. Sometimes not successfully. But no matter. We managed to navigate despite all of these issues.

Streets of Hanoi

We walked out of our hotel located in District 1, Saigon on our last night and there were people everywhere. This was at 1130 pm at night. There were people singing, eating, drinking, chatting and generally lounging around till 3 am in the morning. Unlike Bangalore, where you feel like a criminal at 11 pm, this was place was just the opposite. Many street side pubs were also cashing in on football fever.

Night life in Hanoi

There are millions of motorbikes in the cities, especially Hanoi and HCM which we visited. Interesting though the fact that even despite heavy traffic, there is lesser (noticeable) aggression. In India, we’d be punching one another and bringing our dear departed generations into our brawls. However, the Vietnamese all congregate in the center of the road, at the same time, and then make their way around each other. Magically, everyone finds a way. In the few times we went out, we didn’t see too many folks lose their temper. The honking is relatively lesser too.

Two wheelers rule the streets

And then there are cyclists. Even in the middle of this chaos, cyclists of all ages made their way on two wheels. And they didn’t seem to be bullied into corners or edges of the street, unlike what happens in India. They were very much a part of the ecosystem, demanding an equal share of the road. No one was treated as a lesser mortal on the road because they happened to be on a cycle. And there were so many women, girls, older folks cycling even in peak hour that I was quite amazed. I even saw a dad with two of his young sons cycling on a busy road (a sight that you’ll be hard pressed to see here).

Everyone cycles - old and young

Everyone is a moving market!

Masks are a fashion statement. And supposedly keep pollution at bay. I’m not sure about the efficacy of these masks, which mostly women wear. They adorn every second face. A young university student called Ly I met on a bus said women are very beauty conscious and basically do it to protect their skin from the sun and pollution. I was tempted to buy one for myself, but couldn’t find a mask with cats on it.

Street corners and roads are relatively clean. I saw a lot of sweeping going on in the mornings. This might also be due to the fact that the Vietnamese eat on the streets all the time so they probably want to keep it clean. Except some parts where there was littering (like the China town area in HCM), largely the garbage disposal system seems to be working. And people seem to be a bit more conscious of littering than us Indians.

Street food is a way of life

There is excessive use of thin plastic bags everywhere. They possibly don’t know how much harm all this will do to their environment (yet), but shopkeepers are only too eager to flash out the bags even for the smallest purchase. Whether it’s water, chips, biscuits or anything you buy, the first thing you get is this flimsy plastic bag. And tourists are equally responsible for accepting these despite the fact that everyone is carrying a rucksack or a bag they can carry the stuff in.

Packing it in

Clean rest rooms (and no smell!). What a boon. Especially coming from a country like India where the level of sanitation can drop to dismal lows, I was really thrilled to find clean loos. And most of them didn’t smell. I’m not sure how or what they did, but they didn’t announce their presence the way Indian loos did. Even in remote villages and towns, we were quite pleasantly surprised with the cleanliness and accessibility of restrooms, a major concern for travellers in India. And hardly anyone pees on the road (if it’s practiced, it wasn’t as noticeable as in our country).

Connected everywhere!. This was surprising as we were gearing up to be off the network for a few days. In fact, my fellow travellers armed themselves with local SIMs, which I decided not to go in for. And there was connectivity everywhere – whether it was the hotels, cafes, restaurants, a rustic home stay in a remote village or even our cruise boat on Halong Bay. Wi-Fi is a given and most places will let you use it for free. We actually weren’t off the network anywhere at all!

There are no overweight/obese people in Vietnam. This is actually true. In all our travels there, we didn’t come across one overweight person. Everyone seems to come out of the same sized mould! Despite the fact that their portions are generous and everyone is eating all the time. They’re doing something very right. I want their secret!

Enjoyed the trip immensely and wouldn’t mind returning to see parts of the country, which we missed out this time around.

Six reasons why you should travel in the monsoons

I’m sure there are more, but let’s start with six. In fact, while many tourists shy away from travelling because it’s raining, true travellers will tell you that a place can be enjoyed despite the rain. It’s a mindset that you need to avoid a destination when it rains. Unless, it happens to be a big city. In which case I would say avoid it like plague. You don’t want to deal with clogged roads, drainage overflowing, traffic jams and all the associated issues that the rains bring to our very well planned cities.

A little piece of paradise
The view from a tea garden in Pozhuthana, Wayanad

Anyway, this is about the monsoons. And why it’s a great time to travel. Any place takes on a different hue during the rains. I was in Goa last year for 3 weeks and had the time of my life despite the torrential downpours.

It’s lush and green

The valley before you spreads out like a lush carpet. The roads are framed by green trees and grass on both sides. The hills are showing off their full foliage, again in green. It’s so green that if you’re not used to it, you’d probably need tinted glasses to tone it down. But seriously, green is definitely the colour of the season and we all know that it’s the best one to get your relaxed and rejuvenated. Nature really wears this colour well.

boys having fun
A sight for sore eyes!

You get better deals

You might need to look around a bit and even ask for discounts, but this is a season where you will get lower prices from a lot of home stays, resorts, hotels. If you’re not sure, just ask them. We are spoilt for choose today in the array of options available. And in this era of social media, even if we don’t look for them, they will probably land up in our stream anyway.

Lesser people to fight with for space

So one of the reasons I travel is to get away from the city (where I clearly see the alarming impact of producing a billion and more people) to smaller destinations and locations where you’ll see a soul once in a while. Get away from the madding crowds, the hoi-polloi and give yourself some breathing space. I love the feeling and I recommend it to everyone (at least once in a while).

Nestled in between
Choose places a bit away from the main towns – usually they’re much more peaceful and calm

There’s colour everywhere

Just before the onset of the monsoons, it’s a pretty sight all around. While on a walk outside today in Wayanad where I am currently, I saw so much variety in foliage that I couldn’t stop myself from clicking everything in sight. From vivid reds, to oranges, to colourful yellows and pretty pinks – there are beautiful blossoms everywhere adding to the prettiness quotient of your frames.

A time for blossoms
It’s amazingly pretty this time of the year and you need to step out to witness nature’s gorgeous hues

Carrying a torch for you
A flower called ginger torch that I saw for the first time

Rediscover the joy of getting soaked

I remember as kids, we loved getting wet in the rains. In fact, we would wait impatiently so we could all rush out and do our rain dance. Our parents had to cajole us to come indoors since we would just be out for hours on end. But what a feeling. Do it sometime. Just get wet. Feel the rain on your skin. Instead of running for a raincoat or an umbrella, soak in the sensation of a rain bath. I can tell you from experience – it’s true joy. Last year, on a trek in Wayanad, I got soaked to the skin as it started pouring cats and dogs. But once I gave in to it, began to enjoy the feeling, I realised that I need to let go. (And yes, we will eventually dry off.)

Comparing notes
With or without rain gear, have some fun

Smell the coffee. And the flowers

The monuments are done and dusted. The hectic sightseeing has been completed. Now, just sit on your balcony and watch the rain. Meditate. Open the door of your room and just relax. Do yoga. Listen to the birds. The rains are a great time to just not venture out and give yourself the “me” time you so badly need (and you didn’t even know)!

A welcome view
I totally believe in doing nothing holidays – they are good for the soul

ADDENDUM:

Another reason, contributed by a friend

Monsoons are the best time for ayurvedic massages

So, during the Kerala Blog Express, we met a doctor at the Manaltheeram Ayurvedic resort who told us about how the ayurvedic massage is the most effective during the rainy season. In fact, many guests come specifically during this period for treatments. A combination of the temperature, rains and other factors all adds to increasing the effectiveness of the oils. So, isn’t this reason enough?!

So there – I hope I’ve given you enough reasons to step out this rainy season. And if you did, or plan to, do share your “getting soaked” experience!

More photos on Flickr

(NOTE: On this trip, I am using the Canon 500D body and the 17-85 mm lens. All photos [except no 3 and 7 from an earlier collection] in the post are with this equipment provided my photography gear & equipment partner, “Book My Lens”. I’m happy to announce them as a partner and I’m quite impressed with the kind of services they provide. They are a photography equipment rental service based in Bangalore which provides quick service for photography enthusiasts who want to experience all lenses and accessories from Canon and Nikon. Their aim is to provide the best in class, at affordable prices. Do check them out on bookmylens.com)

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And here’s presenting the world richest temple!

Well, we’re told the jury is yet to come in on that one. But what we’re sure is that it’s a really, really, really rich temple.

So in case you thought you were visiting a poor nation, steeped in poverty, with lots of homeless people (possibly also true); the other side of the story is that we also possess not one, but two of the richest temples in the world.

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Between, the Sri Padmanabhaswamy temple and the Tirupati temple, we could potentially have enough to feed the entire nation for a few years.

The temple is located in Thiruvananthapuram, and it shot into fame when in 2010, the news broke about all the wealth it was holding, deep within it’s vaults. An NDTV 2011 report says: “Last July, the world’s attention turned to the temple when the committee unearthed what one of its members said was gold, diamonds and precious antiques worth up to $40 billion.”

A kid running excitedly towards the temple.

A kid running excitedly towards the temple.

40 billion dollars! Now that is no small sum. And a little ironical coming to think of it. At least, if God does actually exist, he’s having a big laugh about all the wealth he’s collected over centuries. And it’s not like he hasn’t got enough already.

Anyway, if you (like me) were sleeping (or distracted by other things) while this news broke, in 2010, it was ordered that the contents of the vaults of the Padmanbhaswamy temple be made public. And that’s when all the jewels, gold and silver came (literally) tumbling out.

According to another NDTV report: “The four vaults already opened in recent days at the temple in Thiruvananthapuram, the capital of the southern state of Kerala, held a vast bounty that unofficial estimates peg at Rs. 90,000 crore. Other treasures unearthed so far include statues of gods and goddesses made of solid gold and studded with diamonds, rubies, emeralds and other precious stones, crowns and necklaces, all given as gifts to the temple over the centuries.’

A couple getting ready to enter the temple premises

A couple getting ready to enter the temple premises

They’re now in lengthy discussions (where I would love to be a fly in the wall!) about what to do with all the wealth and going by our record for debates, this one is going to be a very long one.

The wealth they’ve unearthed is apparently enough (of course, after many months of assessment) to wipe off India’s debt. But of course, they’re not going to do that. Someone suggested a closely guarded museum. That makes so much more sense right? Get people to admire all these riches from a distance. Hmm… Some have suggested the treasures being sold and the money being used for development of Kerala.

Coming back to these riches, the $40 billion dollars is only an estimation. I am rather curious to know what’s going to happen with all the riches. I know I’m not getting a cent, though some spare change would always help.

Security was ramped up when the news about the treasures was revealed. There are hidden cameras and black cat commandos all around. Apparently, some of the bare torso-exhibiting priests might also be security staff. Not surprisingly. You wouldn’t want someone to break in and suddenly run away with a lot of India’s (or God’s as the case might be) wealth.

Men need to be dressed in a mundu and women in a saree to enter the temple. It is also only accessible to Hindus.

Men need to be dressed in a mundu and women in a saree to enter the temple. It is also only accessible to Hindus.

Outside the temple, there are vendors who do brisk business renting sarees (for women) and wrap-around (mundus) for men. Garbed in this gear, and of course sporting your Hindu identity you are allowed to enter. We admire it from the distance, and there’s a road around it which you are allowed to walk through. But no photographs are allowed. I spot a shop there where two men are carving intricate wood sculptures of different gods. He starts to show me a few of them, but I have to tell him that I’m not really out to buy anything.

What I came away with is of course the million (or billion) dollar question: what will happen to all this wealth? But I doubt I’ll get an answer. Probably, not in this lifetime.

More news about Padmanabhaswamy temple
Official site

(Note: This trip is part of the 15 day Kerala Blog Express organised by Kerala Tourism with 25 other travellers, which started in Thiruvanthanpuram and makes it way around to Kollam, Kumarakom, Alleppey, Thekkady, Munnar, Wayanad, Calicut and then Cochin.)

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