Anita Recommends, Exercise, Featured, Sports & Adventure
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Fitness on the road: A few strategies that might work

So here’s the problem.

I like good food. And when I’m travelling, food obviously becomes even more of an issue. Let me explain why. I can’t really control what I’m eating. I like trying out local delicacies so I rarely say no. And if my host is cooking something, I would eat even if I’m not hungry (rarely does that happen though). I usually am.

So the big problem is that it doesn’t do any good to my waistline (I can’t actually find it these days). After every holiday, the scales tip a bit more. At this rate, I have to get new scales.

Bringing me to the main topic of this post. With all this gluttony, one has to figure out creative ways to keep fit. I’d love to hear how you do it, but here are some tips from my side. And why “might” work, you might ask? Because as you’ll probably realise, you have to put these to practice for results. So personally, I have tried to make a few of these work. At least I make an effort. At most times!

Devise a yoga routine

I tried this – putting together a series of exercises to keep me occupied for around 45 minutes. The problem is that I rarely actually do it. I also have a very low motivation level when I need to do things on my own. So it makes it all the more harder. I love yoga and have dabbled in all kinds. But asking me to do it on my own is like dragging a horse to water… You get my point.

A 45 minutes yoga session will make you feel refreshed and ready to take on anything!

A 45 minutes yoga session will make you feel refreshed and ready to take on anything

Go out for a jog

Usually, when I arrive at a place, to get a lay of the land, I go out for a jog. It’s a nice way to get familiar with the new roads and also discover the place. I did this during my Europe trip. I particularly remember the picturesque village of Le Vaud in Switzerland, where I was lucky enough to stay for a week. I venture out nearly every day and discover new roads and routes. It’s a lovely quiet village, with enough hills to keep the calf muscles burning. I ran a lot. Around the village. To the next town. I was even tempted to run down to the town at the bottom of the hill, but I realised it would be difficult to get a lift to come back up again.

Where there are footpaths and running trails, make use of them!

Where there are footpaths and running trails, make use of them

In Den Haag, Netherlands, when staying with friends, I was impressed by the city’s efficient network of roads and pathways for cyclists and pedestrians. It was walking and running paradise. After being shoved off the road, being second (no, actually third) class citizens on Bangalore’s road when you’re walking or cycling, this was truly paradise. A part of me didn’t want to come back. Ever. While I was there, I made sure I went out nearly everyday. Found some excellent routes, tree-lined avenues that went on forever. I loved it. And I’m not even a runner. I can just imagine how pleasurable it will be for a real runner.

In Spain, with Stefania, training for her next long run, I had a nice time jogging on Malaga’s very scenic beach, very close to her home. With a location like that, I would run everyday. Yes, I’d probably train for a marathon. But then, I don’t.

Borrow/rent (don’t steal) a cycle

Pedalling is a great way to get some exercise and see a city (a bit faster than walking). Most European cities have great infrastructure for cycling. Every city I visited – Den Haag, Amsterdam, Brussels, Antwerp, Malaga – has cycling lanes and also has places to rent cycles. In Amsterdam I did a cycling tour, enjoying the cycling lanes and getting a view of what the lucky citizens of the city get to experience everyday. In Den Haag, I borrowed a bike and went out exploring the city.

While in Den Haag, I made use of the extensive cycle pathways

While in Den Haag, I made use of the extensive cycle pathways


Rent or borrow a cycle - there's no better way to see a city and get some exercise

Rent or borrow a cycle – there’s no better way to see a city and get some exercise

My best biking experience was in Malaga when I decided to do my own little cycle tour, visiting an automobile museum, a park, a artsy neighbourhood, ending with a climb up (locked the cycle at the bottom of the hill) to watch a most brilliant sunset from a viewpoint called the “Castle of Gibralfaro”.

Enrol for walking tours

I love them! I also found a company called SANDEMANs New Europe which offers free walking tours in nearly all major European cities. And I did 3 of them – in Amsterdam, Brussels and Madrid. It’s a great way to glimpse local culture, food, environment and get interesting nuggets of information that you possibly wouldn’t be able to figure out on your own. Besides the hosts are usually really interesting characters who will keep you more than engaged. So we had Scott in Amsterdam, Berber in Brussels and Michael in Madrid who had their own unique styles and kept us amused and on our toes. The walks are around 3 hours and so you’ll be glad to sink in a chair and order that wine or beer once it’s over.

Walking tours are a great way to explore the city

Walking tours are a great way to explore the city

Hit the hotel gym

Most of them will have some kind of a health club. During our Kerala Blog Express trip, I still remember a particular hotel where we went through a set of darkly lit rooms to discover one treadmill in a corner. So, you never know. If you seek, you might find. I’m not a fan of gyms; give me the outdoors any day. But if there’s absolutely no other option, then it’s a good idea.

Use that pool

Shimmering blue waters beckon. And you look at it. Take photos. Dip your toes in. Contemplate.

Two pools to choose from at the beautiful Crowne Plaza, Kochi

Two pools to choose from at the beautiful Crowne Plaza, Kochi

Well, don’t. Just jump in. There’s nothing like a few laps of a pool to make you emerge refreshed and feeling good. And besides, swimming also burns calories I’ve heard. I love the water. If I had a pool, I’d probably be inside half of the day. So it’s a good thing I don’t. But most hotels come equipped with pools, so it’s a good thing to get in a swim first thing in the morning or towards the end of the day. Avoid those crowds of aunties though who step in wearing everything, including their family heirlooms and jewellery.

Use common objects

Okay, I haven’t actually tried it personally, but a friend vouches for it. You can use chairs, beds, sofas, tables and other such furniture lying around your room (and if you’re staying with friends hopefully they have enough furniture). Or even kitchen objects like water bottles, kettles. Using them as props, you can then do some simple exercises – you need to get creative. Look them up online and list around 10-12 of them in a notebook and do whichever ones are most convenient.

If all else fails, do 100 surya namaskars. Okay, maybe 20. You are on holiday after all.

So what is the routine that works for you?

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2 Comments

  1. Jayadeep Purushothaman says

    I don’t travel much, but when I do I also try the local food and the waist line goes up in quick time 🙁 One other workout that may help is the 100 pushups (hundredpushups.com) program. Especially for business travelers who are hard pressed for time, this is a very good one.

    And off course avoiding travel has been my best strategy 🙂

    • Anita says

      Haha, yes. I know how averse you are to travel 🙂 And 100 pushups?! Wow, I can’t decide which one will be more painful. 100 Surya namaskars or pushups!

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